Two For One At Devil’s Bowl

Two For One At Devil’s Bowl

Tremont & Quenneville Take Home Titles At Vermont Track

DAYTONA BEACH, Fla. – Vermont’s Devil’s Bowl Speedway crowned not one, but two NASCAR Whelen All-American Series Division I track champions in 2017.

No, there wasn’t a tie at the conclusion of the season. Actually, Devil’s Bowl Speedway had not one, but two race tracks sanctioned by NASCAR this season. One is a half-mile asphalt oval and the other is a third-mile clay oval, with each crowning a Division I champion.

On the dirt side, legendary dirt modified racer Kenny Tremont Jr. did something he’d never done before in his lengthy career, win a pair of NASCAR championships. 

“We actually started off pretty good. We were, for the most part, in the top-five the whole year except maybe once or twice,” said the 56-year-old Tremont, who captured the Dirt Sportsman Modified track championship this year at Devil’s Bowl. “Really, compared to the year before, this was a trouble free year really. We ran really well and were able to win some races and when we didn’t win we finish really strong.”

Tremont, wheeling his No. 115 entry carrying sponsorship from S&S Asphalt Paving and Rifenburg Construction, was dominant throughout the season on the dirt at Devil’s Bowl. He won six times in 14 starts and also scored 12 top-five and 13 top-10 finishes. 

Those finishes were enough for Tremont to win the dirt track championship by a mere six points over Tim LaDuc, but that wasn’t all. Tremont’s season-long consistency also garnered him his first NASCAR Whelen All-American Series Vermont championship by 35 points over LaDuc.

“We put a lot of work into it,” Tremont said. “We’ve got good crew members, so as far as the car, the car was pretty much bullet proof as far as finishing this year. It hasn’t always been that way through the years, but I really had a lot of confidence in the car and the car well and handled well.

“Devil’s Bowl, that small track is very tight and it’s very easy to get in trouble. Thankfully this year we were able to stay out of trouble for the most part. We did get tangled up a couple times, but thankfully it wasn’t anything that ended our night and we could get back going. It just worked out.”

U.S. state and province champions are determined by the best 18 finishes at tracks within the respective state or province.

Joining Tremont as a Division I track champion at Devil’s Bowl Speedway this year was another veteran competitor, Vince Quenneville Jr. The 51-year-old racer stood tall on the asphalt track, winning four times in 13 starts to capture his his second-straight NASCAR Division I track championship by 14 points over Ron Proctor.

“Our year was good. We had a really good car. We had very minimal incidents all year, which was great,” Quenneville said. “

Quenneville didn’t just limit his skills to racing on the asphalt track. He also took his talent to the dirt track at Devil’s Bowl, making history by becoming the first driver to win main events on both surfaces on the same weekend. 

“It was a great weekend and at that point I was leading all three, the state and both track championships,” said Quenneville of his historic weekend, which came in late August. “I had a really good year going until the weekend after that on the dirt and then we had four bad weeks and that kind of really took a tole.”

Quenneville accomplished his feat in the nick of time. Mike Bruno, the owner of Devil’s Bowl Speedway, made the announcement in early August that Devil’s Bowl Speeway would focus solely on dirt racing next year.

However, that announcement came with a twist. Instead of shuttering the asphalt track and using just the third-mile dirt track, Bruno intends to cover the half-mile asphalt track with a new dirt surface.

“This decision is something that we have worked hard on for the last three years,” Bruno said in August regarding the decision to focus on dirt racing. “This is very bittersweet for me and my family. We have always loved asphalt racing and we are very proud of what we have accomplished during our six years at Devil’s Bowl. We will always be grateful for the support of our drivers and teams across all of our divisions through the good times and the bad times. Unfortunately, we feel that asphalt racing is heading in the wrong direction in this region and we have to make a change. We are excited to turn the page and start fresh with a brand new dirt track at Devil’s Bowl and build toward the future.”

Quenneville, whose No. 78 carried sponsorship from Black Diamond Builders, admits he’ll be sorry to see the asphalt track at Devil’s Bowl go, but he understands why Bruno was forced to make the decision. 

“I think for the track to survive, the dirt is where it has to go,” Quenneville said. “I was a dirt racer. I started on the dirt, I raced at Devil’s Bowl on the dirt for years. I won a championship there on the dirt (in 2003). I have no problem with going back to dirt, but we had really finally had our asphalt program where it needed to be. We were serious contenders every week.

“So it’s a little bit disheartening on that part, but I completely understand where it’s going and why it has to go there. I have no problem supporting it. I’m very good on the dirt too.”

Tremont, meanwhile, is looking forward to the new challenge that the half-mile dirt oval will present in 2018.

“I’m definitely looking forward to it,” Tremont said. “I actually enjoyed the pavement. The pavement track was great too, it just hard trouble drawing cars. The car count was down as far as the pavement side went. So I understand the move. 

“It should be better racing. Not as tight, less accidents. I’m for it.”

Both Quenneville and Tremont will be honored during NASCAR HomeTracks Awards on Dec. 8 at the Charlotte Convention Center at the NASCAR Hall of Fame. Quenneville has had the honor of attending the ceremony a few times, but Tremont will get to experience for the first time.

“It’s really professional compared to what I’m use too actually. I’m impressed and I’m glad to be involved in it really,” Tremont said. “Your name is forever linked with NASCAR for winning a state championship, which is neat. Then winding it all up at the end of the year with a big banquet at the NASCAR Hall of Fame, everything about it is really exciting and I’m really looking forward to it.”

nwaas_devils_bowl_kenny_tremont

Kenny Tremont Jr. won the dirt title at Devil’s Bowl Speedway and the NASCAR Whelen All-American Series Vermont championship. Michael John Pierce

Two For One At Devil’s Bowl

Two For One At Devil’s Bowl

Tremont & Quenneville Take Home Titles At Vermont Track

DAYTONA BEACH, Fla. – Vermont’s Devil’s Bowl Speedway crowned not one, but two NASCAR Whelen All-American Series Division I track champions in 2017.

No, there wasn’t a tie at the conclusion of the season. Actually, Devil’s Bowl Speedway had not one, but two race tracks sanctioned by NASCAR this season. One is a half-mile asphalt oval and the other is a third-mile clay oval, with each crowning a Division I champion.

On the dirt side, legendary dirt modified racer Kenny Tremont Jr. did something he’d never done before in his lengthy career, win a pair of NASCAR championships. 

“We actually started off pretty good. We were, for the most part, in the top-five the whole year except maybe once or twice,” said the 56-year-old Tremont, who captured the Dirt Sportsman Modified track championship this year at Devil’s Bowl. “Really, compared to the year before, this was a trouble free year really. We ran really well and were able to win some races and when we didn’t win we finish really strong.”

Tremont, wheeling his No. 115 entry carrying sponsorship from S&S Asphalt Paving and Rifenburg Construction, was dominant throughout the season on the dirt at Devil’s Bowl. He won six times in 14 starts and also scored 12 top-five and 13 top-10 finishes. 

Those finishes were enough for Tremont to win the dirt track championship by a mere six points over Tim LaDuc, but that wasn’t all. Tremont’s season-long consistency also garnered him his first NASCAR Whelen All-American Series Vermont championship by 35 points over LaDuc.

“We put a lot of work into it,” Tremont said. “We’ve got good crew members, so as far as the car, the car was pretty much bullet proof as far as finishing this year. It hasn’t always been that way through the years, but I really had a lot of confidence in the car and the car well and handled well.

“Devil’s Bowl, that small track is very tight and it’s very easy to get in trouble. Thankfully this year we were able to stay out of trouble for the most part. We did get tangled up a couple times, but thankfully it wasn’t anything that ended our night and we could get back going. It just worked out.”

U.S. state and province champions are determined by the best 18 finishes at tracks within the respective state or province.

Joining Tremont as a Division I track champion at Devil’s Bowl Speedway this year was another veteran competitor, Vince Quenneville Jr. The 51-year-old racer stood tall on the asphalt track, winning four times in 13 starts to capture his his second-straight NASCAR Division I track championship by 14 points over Ron Proctor.

“Our year was good. We had a really good car. We had very minimal incidents all year, which was great,” Quenneville said. “

Quenneville didn’t just limit his skills to racing on the asphalt track. He also took his talent to the dirt track at Devil’s Bowl, making history by becoming the first driver to win main events on both surfaces on the same weekend. 

“It was a great weekend and at that point I was leading all three, the state and both track championships,” said Quenneville of his historic weekend, which came in late August. “I had a really good year going until the weekend after that on the dirt and then we had four bad weeks and that kind of really took a tole.”

Quenneville accomplished his feat in the nick of time. Mike Bruno, the owner of Devil’s Bowl Speedway, made the announcement in early August that Devil’s Bowl Speeway would focus solely on dirt racing next year.

However, that announcement came with a twist. Instead of shuttering the asphalt track and using just the third-mile dirt track, Bruno intends to cover the half-mile asphalt track with a new dirt surface.

“This decision is something that we have worked hard on for the last three years,” Bruno said in August regarding the decision to focus on dirt racing. “This is very bittersweet for me and my family. We have always loved asphalt racing and we are very proud of what we have accomplished during our six years at Devil’s Bowl. We will always be grateful for the support of our drivers and teams across all of our divisions through the good times and the bad times. Unfortunately, we feel that asphalt racing is heading in the wrong direction in this region and we have to make a change. We are excited to turn the page and start fresh with a brand new dirt track at Devil’s Bowl and build toward the future.”

Quenneville, whose No. 78 carried sponsorship from Black Diamond Builders, admits he’ll be sorry to see the asphalt track at Devil’s Bowl go, but he understands why Bruno was forced to make the decision. 

“I think for the track to survive, the dirt is where it has to go,” Quenneville said. “I was a dirt racer. I started on the dirt, I raced at Devil’s Bowl on the dirt for years. I won a championship there on the dirt (in 2003). I have no problem with going back to dirt, but we had really finally had our asphalt program where it needed to be. We were serious contenders every week.

“So it’s a little bit disheartening on that part, but I completely understand where it’s going and why it has to go there. I have no problem supporting it. I’m very good on the dirt too.”

Tremont, meanwhile, is looking forward to the new challenge that the half-mile dirt oval will present in 2018.

“I’m definitely looking forward to it,” Tremont said. “I actually enjoyed the pavement. The pavement track was great too, it just hard trouble drawing cars. The car count was down as far as the pavement side went. So I understand the move. 

“It should be better racing. Not as tight, less accidents. I’m for it.”

Both Quenneville and Tremont will be honored during NASCAR HomeTracks Awards on Dec. 8 at the Charlotte Convention Center at the NASCAR Hall of Fame. Quenneville has had the honor of attending the ceremony a few times, but Tremont will get to experience for the first time.

“It’s really professional compared to what I’m use too actually. I’m impressed and I’m glad to be involved in it really,” Tremont said. “Your name is forever linked with NASCAR for winning a state championship, which is neat. Then winding it all up at the end of the year with a big banquet at the NASCAR Hall of Fame, everything about it is really exciting and I’m really looking forward to it.”

nwaas_devils_bowl_kenny_tremont

Kenny Tremont Jr. won the dirt title at Devil’s Bowl Speedway and the NASCAR Whelen All-American Series Vermont championship. Michael John Pierce

Two For One At Devil’s Bowl

Two For One At Devil’s Bowl

Tremont & Quenneville Take Home Titles At Vermont Track

DAYTONA BEACH, Fla. – Vermont’s Devil’s Bowl Speedway crowned not one, but two NASCAR Whelen All-American Series Division I track champions in 2017.

No, there wasn’t a tie at the conclusion of the season. Actually, Devil’s Bowl Speedway had not one, but two race tracks sanctioned by NASCAR this season. One is a half-mile asphalt oval and the other is a third-mile clay oval, with each crowning a Division I champion.

On the dirt side, legendary dirt modified racer Kenny Tremont Jr. did something he’d never done before in his lengthy career, win a pair of NASCAR championships. 

“We actually started off pretty good. We were, for the most part, in the top-five the whole year except maybe once or twice,” said the 56-year-old Tremont, who captured the Dirt Sportsman Modified track championship this year at Devil’s Bowl. “Really, compared to the year before, this was a trouble free year really. We ran really well and were able to win some races and when we didn’t win we finish really strong.”

Tremont, wheeling his No. 115 entry carrying sponsorship from S&S Asphalt Paving and Rifenburg Construction, was dominant throughout the season on the dirt at Devil’s Bowl. He won six times in 14 starts and also scored 12 top-five and 13 top-10 finishes. 

Those finishes were enough for Tremont to win the dirt track championship by a mere six points over Tim LaDuc, but that wasn’t all. Tremont’s season-long consistency also garnered him his first NASCAR Whelen All-American Series Vermont championship by 35 points over LaDuc.

“We put a lot of work into it,” Tremont said. “We’ve got good crew members, so as far as the car, the car was pretty much bullet proof as far as finishing this year. It hasn’t always been that way through the years, but I really had a lot of confidence in the car and the car well and handled well.

“Devil’s Bowl, that small track is very tight and it’s very easy to get in trouble. Thankfully this year we were able to stay out of trouble for the most part. We did get tangled up a couple times, but thankfully it wasn’t anything that ended our night and we could get back going. It just worked out.”

U.S. state and province champions are determined by the best 18 finishes at tracks within the respective state or province.

Joining Tremont as a Division I track champion at Devil’s Bowl Speedway this year was another veteran competitor, Vince Quenneville Jr. The 51-year-old racer stood tall on the asphalt track, winning four times in 13 starts to capture his his second-straight NASCAR Division I track championship by 14 points over Ron Proctor.

“Our year was good. We had a really good car. We had very minimal incidents all year, which was great,” Quenneville said. “

Quenneville didn’t just limit his skills to racing on the asphalt track. He also took his talent to the dirt track at Devil’s Bowl, making history by becoming the first driver to win main events on both surfaces on the same weekend. 

“It was a great weekend and at that point I was leading all three, the state and both track championships,” said Quenneville of his historic weekend, which came in late August. “I had a really good year going until the weekend after that on the dirt and then we had four bad weeks and that kind of really took a tole.”

Quenneville accomplished his feat in the nick of time. Mike Bruno, the owner of Devil’s Bowl Speedway, made the announcement in early August that Devil’s Bowl Speeway would focus solely on dirt racing next year.

However, that announcement came with a twist. Instead of shuttering the asphalt track and using just the third-mile dirt track, Bruno intends to cover the half-mile asphalt track with a new dirt surface.

“This decision is something that we have worked hard on for the last three years,” Bruno said in August regarding the decision to focus on dirt racing. “This is very bittersweet for me and my family. We have always loved asphalt racing and we are very proud of what we have accomplished during our six years at Devil’s Bowl. We will always be grateful for the support of our drivers and teams across all of our divisions through the good times and the bad times. Unfortunately, we feel that asphalt racing is heading in the wrong direction in this region and we have to make a change. We are excited to turn the page and start fresh with a brand new dirt track at Devil’s Bowl and build toward the future.”

Quenneville, whose No. 78 carried sponsorship from Black Diamond Builders, admits he’ll be sorry to see the asphalt track at Devil’s Bowl go, but he understands why Bruno was forced to make the decision. 

“I think for the track to survive, the dirt is where it has to go,” Quenneville said. “I was a dirt racer. I started on the dirt, I raced at Devil’s Bowl on the dirt for years. I won a championship there on the dirt (in 2003). I have no problem with going back to dirt, but we had really finally had our asphalt program where it needed to be. We were serious contenders every week.

“So it’s a little bit disheartening on that part, but I completely understand where it’s going and why it has to go there. I have no problem supporting it. I’m very good on the dirt too.”

Tremont, meanwhile, is looking forward to the new challenge that the half-mile dirt oval will present in 2018.

“I’m definitely looking forward to it,” Tremont said. “I actually enjoyed the pavement. The pavement track was great too, it just hard trouble drawing cars. The car count was down as far as the pavement side went. So I understand the move. 

“It should be better racing. Not as tight, less accidents. I’m for it.”

Both Quenneville and Tremont will be honored during NASCAR HomeTracks Awards on Dec. 8 at the Charlotte Convention Center at the NASCAR Hall of Fame. Quenneville has had the honor of attending the ceremony a few times, but Tremont will get to experience for the first time.

“It’s really professional compared to what I’m use too actually. I’m impressed and I’m glad to be involved in it really,” Tremont said. “Your name is forever linked with NASCAR for winning a state championship, which is neat. Then winding it all up at the end of the year with a big banquet at the NASCAR Hall of Fame, everything about it is really exciting and I’m really looking forward to it.”

nwaas_devils_bowl_kenny_tremont

Kenny Tremont Jr. won the dirt title at Devil’s Bowl Speedway and the NASCAR Whelen All-American Series Vermont championship. Michael John Pierce

Two For One At Devil’s Bowl

Two For One At Devil’s Bowl

Tremont & Quenneville Take Home Titles At Vermont Track

DAYTONA BEACH, Fla. – Vermont’s Devil’s Bowl Speedway crowned not one, but two NASCAR Whelen All-American Series Division I track champions in 2017.

No, there wasn’t a tie at the conclusion of the season. Actually, Devil’s Bowl Speedway had not one, but two race tracks sanctioned by NASCAR this season. One is a half-mile asphalt oval and the other is a third-mile clay oval, with each crowning a Division I champion.

On the dirt side, legendary dirt modified racer Kenny Tremont Jr. did something he’d never done before in his lengthy career, win a pair of NASCAR championships. 

“We actually started off pretty good. We were, for the most part, in the top-five the whole year except maybe once or twice,” said the 56-year-old Tremont, who captured the Dirt Sportsman Modified track championship this year at Devil’s Bowl. “Really, compared to the year before, this was a trouble free year really. We ran really well and were able to win some races and when we didn’t win we finish really strong.”

Tremont, wheeling his No. 115 entry carrying sponsorship from S&S Asphalt Paving and Rifenburg Construction, was dominant throughout the season on the dirt at Devil’s Bowl. He won six times in 14 starts and also scored 12 top-five and 13 top-10 finishes. 

Those finishes were enough for Tremont to win the dirt track championship by a mere six points over Tim LaDuc, but that wasn’t all. Tremont’s season-long consistency also garnered him his first NASCAR Whelen All-American Series Vermont championship by 35 points over LaDuc.

“We put a lot of work into it,” Tremont said. “We’ve got good crew members, so as far as the car, the car was pretty much bullet proof as far as finishing this year. It hasn’t always been that way through the years, but I really had a lot of confidence in the car and the car well and handled well.

“Devil’s Bowl, that small track is very tight and it’s very easy to get in trouble. Thankfully this year we were able to stay out of trouble for the most part. We did get tangled up a couple times, but thankfully it wasn’t anything that ended our night and we could get back going. It just worked out.”

U.S. state and province champions are determined by the best 18 finishes at tracks within the respective state or province.

Joining Tremont as a Division I track champion at Devil’s Bowl Speedway this year was another veteran competitor, Vince Quenneville Jr. The 51-year-old racer stood tall on the asphalt track, winning four times in 13 starts to capture his his second-straight NASCAR Division I track championship by 14 points over Ron Proctor.

“Our year was good. We had a really good car. We had very minimal incidents all year, which was great,” Quenneville said. “

Quenneville didn’t just limit his skills to racing on the asphalt track. He also took his talent to the dirt track at Devil’s Bowl, making history by becoming the first driver to win main events on both surfaces on the same weekend. 

“It was a great weekend and at that point I was leading all three, the state and both track championships,” said Quenneville of his historic weekend, which came in late August. “I had a really good year going until the weekend after that on the dirt and then we had four bad weeks and that kind of really took a tole.”

Quenneville accomplished his feat in the nick of time. Mike Bruno, the owner of Devil’s Bowl Speedway, made the announcement in early August that Devil’s Bowl Speeway would focus solely on dirt racing next year.

However, that announcement came with a twist. Instead of shuttering the asphalt track and using just the third-mile dirt track, Bruno intends to cover the half-mile asphalt track with a new dirt surface.

“This decision is something that we have worked hard on for the last three years,” Bruno said in August regarding the decision to focus on dirt racing. “This is very bittersweet for me and my family. We have always loved asphalt racing and we are very proud of what we have accomplished during our six years at Devil’s Bowl. We will always be grateful for the support of our drivers and teams across all of our divisions through the good times and the bad times. Unfortunately, we feel that asphalt racing is heading in the wrong direction in this region and we have to make a change. We are excited to turn the page and start fresh with a brand new dirt track at Devil’s Bowl and build toward the future.”

Quenneville, whose No. 78 carried sponsorship from Black Diamond Builders, admits he’ll be sorry to see the asphalt track at Devil’s Bowl go, but he understands why Bruno was forced to make the decision. 

“I think for the track to survive, the dirt is where it has to go,” Quenneville said. “I was a dirt racer. I started on the dirt, I raced at Devil’s Bowl on the dirt for years. I won a championship there on the dirt (in 2003). I have no problem with going back to dirt, but we had really finally had our asphalt program where it needed to be. We were serious contenders every week.

“So it’s a little bit disheartening on that part, but I completely understand where it’s going and why it has to go there. I have no problem supporting it. I’m very good on the dirt too.”

Tremont, meanwhile, is looking forward to the new challenge that the half-mile dirt oval will present in 2018.

“I’m definitely looking forward to it,” Tremont said. “I actually enjoyed the pavement. The pavement track was great too, it just hard trouble drawing cars. The car count was down as far as the pavement side went. So I understand the move. 

“It should be better racing. Not as tight, less accidents. I’m for it.”

Both Quenneville and Tremont will be honored during NASCAR HomeTracks Awards on Dec. 8 at the Charlotte Convention Center at the NASCAR Hall of Fame. Quenneville has had the honor of attending the ceremony a few times, but Tremont will get to experience for the first time.

“It’s really professional compared to what I’m use too actually. I’m impressed and I’m glad to be involved in it really,” Tremont said. “Your name is forever linked with NASCAR for winning a state championship, which is neat. Then winding it all up at the end of the year with a big banquet at the NASCAR Hall of Fame, everything about it is really exciting and I’m really looking forward to it.”

nwaas_devils_bowl_kenny_tremont

Kenny Tremont Jr. won the dirt title at Devil’s Bowl Speedway and the NASCAR Whelen All-American Series Vermont championship. Michael John Pierce

Two For One At Devil’s Bowl

Two For One At Devil’s Bowl

Tremont & Quenneville Take Home Titles At Vermont Track

DAYTONA BEACH, Fla. – Vermont’s Devil’s Bowl Speedway crowned not one, but two NASCAR Whelen All-American Series Division I track champions in 2017.

No, there wasn’t a tie at the conclusion of the season. Actually, Devil’s Bowl Speedway had not one, but two race tracks sanctioned by NASCAR this season. One is a half-mile asphalt oval and the other is a third-mile clay oval, with each crowning a Division I champion.

On the dirt side, legendary dirt modified racer Kenny Tremont Jr. did something he’d never done before in his lengthy career, win a pair of NASCAR championships. 

“We actually started off pretty good. We were, for the most part, in the top-five the whole year except maybe once or twice,” said the 56-year-old Tremont, who captured the Dirt Sportsman Modified track championship this year at Devil’s Bowl. “Really, compared to the year before, this was a trouble free year really. We ran really well and were able to win some races and when we didn’t win we finish really strong.”

Tremont, wheeling his No. 115 entry carrying sponsorship from S&S Asphalt Paving and Rifenburg Construction, was dominant throughout the season on the dirt at Devil’s Bowl. He won six times in 14 starts and also scored 12 top-five and 13 top-10 finishes. 

Those finishes were enough for Tremont to win the dirt track championship by a mere six points over Tim LaDuc, but that wasn’t all. Tremont’s season-long consistency also garnered him his first NASCAR Whelen All-American Series Vermont championship by 35 points over LaDuc.

“We put a lot of work into it,” Tremont said. “We’ve got good crew members, so as far as the car, the car was pretty much bullet proof as far as finishing this year. It hasn’t always been that way through the years, but I really had a lot of confidence in the car and the car well and handled well.

“Devil’s Bowl, that small track is very tight and it’s very easy to get in trouble. Thankfully this year we were able to stay out of trouble for the most part. We did get tangled up a couple times, but thankfully it wasn’t anything that ended our night and we could get back going. It just worked out.”

U.S. state and province champions are determined by the best 18 finishes at tracks within the respective state or province.

Joining Tremont as a Division I track champion at Devil’s Bowl Speedway this year was another veteran competitor, Vince Quenneville Jr. The 51-year-old racer stood tall on the asphalt track, winning four times in 13 starts to capture his his second-straight NASCAR Division I track championship by 14 points over Ron Proctor.

“Our year was good. We had a really good car. We had very minimal incidents all year, which was great,” Quenneville said. “

Quenneville didn’t just limit his skills to racing on the asphalt track. He also took his talent to the dirt track at Devil’s Bowl, making history by becoming the first driver to win main events on both surfaces on the same weekend. 

“It was a great weekend and at that point I was leading all three, the state and both track championships,” said Quenneville of his historic weekend, which came in late August. “I had a really good year going until the weekend after that on the dirt and then we had four bad weeks and that kind of really took a tole.”

Quenneville accomplished his feat in the nick of time. Mike Bruno, the owner of Devil’s Bowl Speedway, made the announcement in early August that Devil’s Bowl Speeway would focus solely on dirt racing next year.

However, that announcement came with a twist. Instead of shuttering the asphalt track and using just the third-mile dirt track, Bruno intends to cover the half-mile asphalt track with a new dirt surface.

“This decision is something that we have worked hard on for the last three years,” Bruno said in August regarding the decision to focus on dirt racing. “This is very bittersweet for me and my family. We have always loved asphalt racing and we are very proud of what we have accomplished during our six years at Devil’s Bowl. We will always be grateful for the support of our drivers and teams across all of our divisions through the good times and the bad times. Unfortunately, we feel that asphalt racing is heading in the wrong direction in this region and we have to make a change. We are excited to turn the page and start fresh with a brand new dirt track at Devil’s Bowl and build toward the future.”

Quenneville, whose No. 78 carried sponsorship from Black Diamond Builders, admits he’ll be sorry to see the asphalt track at Devil’s Bowl go, but he understands why Bruno was forced to make the decision. 

“I think for the track to survive, the dirt is where it has to go,” Quenneville said. “I was a dirt racer. I started on the dirt, I raced at Devil’s Bowl on the dirt for years. I won a championship there on the dirt (in 2003). I have no problem with going back to dirt, but we had really finally had our asphalt program where it needed to be. We were serious contenders every week.

“So it’s a little bit disheartening on that part, but I completely understand where it’s going and why it has to go there. I have no problem supporting it. I’m very good on the dirt too.”

Tremont, meanwhile, is looking forward to the new challenge that the half-mile dirt oval will present in 2018.

“I’m definitely looking forward to it,” Tremont said. “I actually enjoyed the pavement. The pavement track was great too, it just hard trouble drawing cars. The car count was down as far as the pavement side went. So I understand the move. 

“It should be better racing. Not as tight, less accidents. I’m for it.”

Both Quenneville and Tremont will be honored during NASCAR HomeTracks Awards on Dec. 8 at the Charlotte Convention Center at the NASCAR Hall of Fame. Quenneville has had the honor of attending the ceremony a few times, but Tremont will get to experience for the first time.

“It’s really professional compared to what I’m use too actually. I’m impressed and I’m glad to be involved in it really,” Tremont said. “Your name is forever linked with NASCAR for winning a state championship, which is neat. Then winding it all up at the end of the year with a big banquet at the NASCAR Hall of Fame, everything about it is really exciting and I’m really looking forward to it.”

nwaas_devils_bowl_kenny_tremont

Kenny Tremont Jr. won the dirt title at Devil’s Bowl Speedway and the NASCAR Whelen All-American Series Vermont championship. Michael John Pierce

Two For One At Devil’s Bowl

Two For One At Devil’s Bowl

Tremont & Quenneville Take Home Titles At Vermont Track

DAYTONA BEACH, Fla. – Vermont’s Devil’s Bowl Speedway crowned not one, but two NASCAR Whelen All-American Series Division I track champions in 2017.

No, there wasn’t a tie at the conclusion of the season. Actually, Devil’s Bowl Speedway had not one, but two race tracks sanctioned by NASCAR this season. One is a half-mile asphalt oval and the other is a third-mile clay oval, with each crowning a Division I champion.

On the dirt side, legendary dirt modified racer Kenny Tremont Jr. did something he’d never done before in his lengthy career, win a pair of NASCAR championships. 

“We actually started off pretty good. We were, for the most part, in the top-five the whole year except maybe once or twice,” said the 56-year-old Tremont, who captured the Dirt Sportsman Modified track championship this year at Devil’s Bowl. “Really, compared to the year before, this was a trouble free year really. We ran really well and were able to win some races and when we didn’t win we finish really strong.”

Tremont, wheeling his No. 115 entry carrying sponsorship from S&S Asphalt Paving and Rifenburg Construction, was dominant throughout the season on the dirt at Devil’s Bowl. He won six times in 14 starts and also scored 12 top-five and 13 top-10 finishes. 

Those finishes were enough for Tremont to win the dirt track championship by a mere six points over Tim LaDuc, but that wasn’t all. Tremont’s season-long consistency also garnered him his first NASCAR Whelen All-American Series Vermont championship by 35 points over LaDuc.

“We put a lot of work into it,” Tremont said. “We’ve got good crew members, so as far as the car, the car was pretty much bullet proof as far as finishing this year. It hasn’t always been that way through the years, but I really had a lot of confidence in the car and the car well and handled well.

“Devil’s Bowl, that small track is very tight and it’s very easy to get in trouble. Thankfully this year we were able to stay out of trouble for the most part. We did get tangled up a couple times, but thankfully it wasn’t anything that ended our night and we could get back going. It just worked out.”

U.S. state and province champions are determined by the best 18 finishes at tracks within the respective state or province.

Joining Tremont as a Division I track champion at Devil’s Bowl Speedway this year was another veteran competitor, Vince Quenneville Jr. The 51-year-old racer stood tall on the asphalt track, winning four times in 13 starts to capture his his second-straight NASCAR Division I track championship by 14 points over Ron Proctor.

“Our year was good. We had a really good car. We had very minimal incidents all year, which was great,” Quenneville said. “

Quenneville didn’t just limit his skills to racing on the asphalt track. He also took his talent to the dirt track at Devil’s Bowl, making history by becoming the first driver to win main events on both surfaces on the same weekend. 

“It was a great weekend and at that point I was leading all three, the state and both track championships,” said Quenneville of his historic weekend, which came in late August. “I had a really good year going until the weekend after that on the dirt and then we had four bad weeks and that kind of really took a tole.”

Quenneville accomplished his feat in the nick of time. Mike Bruno, the owner of Devil’s Bowl Speedway, made the announcement in early August that Devil’s Bowl Speeway would focus solely on dirt racing next year.

However, that announcement came with a twist. Instead of shuttering the asphalt track and using just the third-mile dirt track, Bruno intends to cover the half-mile asphalt track with a new dirt surface.

“This decision is something that we have worked hard on for the last three years,” Bruno said in August regarding the decision to focus on dirt racing. “This is very bittersweet for me and my family. We have always loved asphalt racing and we are very proud of what we have accomplished during our six years at Devil’s Bowl. We will always be grateful for the support of our drivers and teams across all of our divisions through the good times and the bad times. Unfortunately, we feel that asphalt racing is heading in the wrong direction in this region and we have to make a change. We are excited to turn the page and start fresh with a brand new dirt track at Devil’s Bowl and build toward the future.”

Quenneville, whose No. 78 carried sponsorship from Black Diamond Builders, admits he’ll be sorry to see the asphalt track at Devil’s Bowl go, but he understands why Bruno was forced to make the decision. 

“I think for the track to survive, the dirt is where it has to go,” Quenneville said. “I was a dirt racer. I started on the dirt, I raced at Devil’s Bowl on the dirt for years. I won a championship there on the dirt (in 2003). I have no problem with going back to dirt, but we had really finally had our asphalt program where it needed to be. We were serious contenders every week.

“So it’s a little bit disheartening on that part, but I completely understand where it’s going and why it has to go there. I have no problem supporting it. I’m very good on the dirt too.”

Tremont, meanwhile, is looking forward to the new challenge that the half-mile dirt oval will present in 2018.

“I’m definitely looking forward to it,” Tremont said. “I actually enjoyed the pavement. The pavement track was great too, it just hard trouble drawing cars. The car count was down as far as the pavement side went. So I understand the move. 

“It should be better racing. Not as tight, less accidents. I’m for it.”

Both Quenneville and Tremont will be honored during NASCAR HomeTracks Awards on Dec. 8 at the Charlotte Convention Center at the NASCAR Hall of Fame. Quenneville has had the honor of attending the ceremony a few times, but Tremont will get to experience for the first time.

“It’s really professional compared to what I’m use too actually. I’m impressed and I’m glad to be involved in it really,” Tremont said. “Your name is forever linked with NASCAR for winning a state championship, which is neat. Then winding it all up at the end of the year with a big banquet at the NASCAR Hall of Fame, everything about it is really exciting and I’m really looking forward to it.”

nwaas_devils_bowl_kenny_tremont

Kenny Tremont Jr. won the dirt title at Devil’s Bowl Speedway and the NASCAR Whelen All-American Series Vermont championship. Michael John Pierce

Solomito Eager To Get Back On Track

Solomito Eager To Get Back On Track

Chasing Whelen Mod Title With Sponsor Starrett Tools

DAYTONA BEACH, Fla. — Even though there are still three months before the drop of the first green flag for the NASCAR Whelen Modified Tour season, Timmy Solomito is eager to hit the track again.

And if his last two years of results show anything, Solomito is going to be a major threat for the championship in 2018. 

The Islip, New York, driver, who has frequented Victory Lane in the last two years, will be entering his fifth season of full-time competition on the tour. The season will also be his fourth driving for Eric Sanderson and the Flamingo Motorsports team — a combination that has been successful right from their first race together.

In 2015, Solomito finished sixth in the championship standings and scored three finishes inside the top five. A year later, he opened the 2016 season by winning the Icebreaker at Thompson Speedway Motorsports Park in Connecticut, his first victory on the tour. Since then, he has put together a stat line that includes eight more victories and finishes of third and second in the standings in the last two years.

“Our first year, we knew it was going to be a learning-curve. I always had my dad being my crew chief before that. Working with Sly has been a real pleasure, he’s a great guy and has been really patient with me,” Solomito said. “My goal going into our second season was just to win one race and when we came out of it winning four and having a chance to win the championship, it was just great. We just never give up. Sly never gives up, the team never gives up. We may have some bad races here and there, but we get back on the track, finish the race and learn from them. We have been building a notebook — hopefully we can continue that this year and come out strong.”

Entering 2018, Solomito is looking to take that next step. After two seasons of coming close to capturing his first title, the 26-year-old is hoping the experience the team has collected will aide them in achieving their ultimate goal. In the first six races of 2017, Solomito won three times. But a difficult stretch in the summer, which included four finishes outside the top 10 and two DNFs, ultimately hurt his chances. 

“We just want to run as hard as we can, win races and have fun,” Solomito said. “The summer stretch kind of got us in a little bit of a slump, but I feel like we ended up finishing the season the same way that we started, and that’s really strong. The summer is certainly a point of the year I want to focus on and get better at. We had two really fast cars at Loudon last year, but we just weren’t able to finish the races. Going back there, I’m looking for some revenge, I’m looking to find Victory Lane.”

For the second straight season, Solomito’s team will welcome Starrett Tools back as their primary sponsor. The Athol, Massachusetts, company also sponsored tour regular Matt Swanson during the 2017 season. They have extended their sponsorship and also joined the contingency program at Stafford Motor Speedway as well for 2018. 

“It’s been great, it definitely helped us step it up,” Solomito said of the partnership. “It’s great for our team, a really great opportunity for us. They have been really great to have at the track and they are really into the sport as a whole. Hopefully we can continue carrying their name on our car and making them proud. At the end of the day, we want to help make some sales for Starrett.”

Solomito has seen five-time champion Doug Coby have plenty of success as of late, but is hoping he can be the driver that can take him off the top of the series. 

“It’s not really frustrating (for me), Doug has been doing it a long time, Phil, the team, they are really good at what they do,” Solomito said of Coby’s team. “They put the time in, but we are putting the time in right behind them. If anything, I feel like I have the best bunch of guys to be able to knock those guys off. They know that we are there and they know we are looking to do better. They do a really good job and it just sets the bar even higher for us.”

The NASCAR Whelen Modified Tour season begins on Saturday, March 17, at South Carolina’s Myrtle Beach Speedway, where Solomito is the defending winner of the 150-lap event. The 2018 schedule includes 16 points championship events and one non-points event at New Hampshire Motor Speedway. It will conclude at Thompson in October. 

“Myrtle Beach is a really cool track, there is a lot that comes into play there and it was really cool to win there last year. It’s always important to start off strong — we have the last two years,” Solomito said. “We won the race at Thompson and then won the Myrtle Beach opener last year. Those two races really set us up to have a breakout year. We’re excited to go back to those tracks we have run good at, but also those tracks we ran so-so at, I feel like we have improved at.”

However, before the season gets underway, Solomito has planned to compete in the 52nd annual World Series of Asphalt Stock Car Racing at New Smyrna Speedway in the Tour-Type Modified division. 

“It’s always nice,” Solomito said of the week that is ahead of him down in New Smyrna. “Last year, I feel like it helped us quite a bit, we went down there and experimented with a bunch of stuff and found some things we liked. I’m just hoping we can build on last year and just find a little bit more speed.”

For a former Riverhead Raceway regular entering his fifth full-time season on the NASCAR Whelen Modified Tour, Solomito has come a long way. 

“Growing up, you always want to go to the races on Saturday night, and you want to be the guy that wins races and championships. Looking back on it, from where I started to where I am now, it’s pretty amazing,” Solomito said. “There are days that you want to throw the towel in and other days where you never want to stop racing. There are a lot of people behind me pushing me to get better. There is always a lot of improvement to come, but to say that we have made it this far and won some Whelen Modified Tour races, if you would have told me that when I was 12 or 13-years-old, I’d be a really happy camper with where we are now. I’m just excited for the future.”

Bonsignore Sets Sights On Championship

Bonsignore Sets Sights On Championship

Phoenix Communications Returns As Sponsor; New CC On Board

BELLPORT, N.Y. – Kenneth Massa Motorsports has announced its 2018 plans for the NASCAR Whelen Modified Tour. Veteran driver Justin Bonsignore will drive a LFR Car as he races for the NWMT championship with Ryan Stone as his crew chief.

 “I’m very pleased we were able to put this deal together after a tremendous amount of work,” said Ken Massa, team owner. “This will bring our team to the next level. We didn’t have the season we wanted to last year and after an exhaustive process, speaking to all the manufactures, and a handful of crew chiefs, we have it nailed down. I’m ready to put our team and sponsor back in Victory Lane and work toward earning our first championship in the series.”

Additionally, it was announced that Phoenix Communications Inc., a leading provider of fiber optic construction services to the telecommunications industry and municipalities throughout the northeastern United States, will continue its partnership with KMM serving as the primary sponsor of the No. 51 NWMT race car.

“The anticipation for the 2018 NWMT season has been building since last season’s finale at Thompson,” said Mark Langevin, President of Phoenix Communications. “The effort and dedication from Ken and Justin has always been there, so to see that high level of determination continue into the offseason spoke volumes. Last season didn’t go the way we had hoped but had its moments that showed just how close we were to making our way back into Victory Lane. With the changes made this offseason to both car and crew we cannot wait to see what the future has in store for the No. 51 team.”

Bonsignore will start his ninth season with KMM in 2018. He has scored 12 wins during his NWMT career and ranked in the Top-3 in final championship standings in three of the past four years.

“I’m very excited and anxious to get the 2018 season started, racing can be a humbling sport and the 2017 season didn’t turn out to be the season we had hoped for,” said Bonsignore. “I feel that bringing Ryan (Stone) on board and making the switch to LFR Chassis will elevate our team back to the level we need to be to contend for wins and a championship. Ryan and I have always been friendly at the races, and I feel our chemistry will be there right away, along with having Rob (Fuller) in our corner for support, I am very confident that this season will be a successful one.”

“None of this would be possible without the return of Phoenix Communications Inc. coming back on board,” continued Bonsignore. “Mark and Marie Langevin stood behind us with their full support last year, and I really want to get them and my team of guys back to Victory Lane more than anything else.”

Calling the shots for Bonsignore will be 20-year racing veteran Ryan Stone, who won the 2011 NWMT championship as crew chief for Ron Silk. He has more than a decade of experience in modified racing as a driver, car chief and crew chief including three years working at LFR.

“This is a great opportunity for me to get back home to Connecticut and get back working with the modifieds and LFR which is where my heart is,” said Stone. “I’m glad I got the experience to work in the South for a short time to see what it was all about, but I’m excited to get back up North and work with Justin and Ken. I spent a lot of time with Rob while we built the LFR brand so I know we will have the equipment that can contend for a championship.”

Massa was pleased to have Stone join the team, someone he felt would be a perfect fit.

“It’s funny, because we approached Ryan earlier and he turned us down, but I guess I owe it to Rob for keeping after it,” said Massa. “Eventually Ryan came back to the table and we were able to finish the deal. Rob put in a lot of work to make this happen, and showed that he was determined to get the 51 Team in LFR equipment, and that means a lot when there are so many choices of what car to run.”

Rob Fuller created LFR in order to take modified chassis design and customer service to the next level. Since its inception in 2014, LFR has secured the NASCAR Whelen Modified Tour championship every year.

“A team like KMM can go to any design car they want honestly,” said Fuller. “I have had my eye on them for a couple years now and knew they were a better group than what they were showing, and thought they would be a perfect addition to the LFR team. Ken and Justin came to the LFR shop before the holidays and their reaction to the cars was what I hoped it would be. Ken explained that he watched our house car this year and was impressed with our results. Also, the teams that made a change to LFR in recent years, all had immediate improvements in performance. Justin was just as impressed and is ready to start winning races again. I believe this team will be back where they belong in 2018.”

KMM will kick-off the racing season with the opening NASCAR Whelen Modified Tour race at Myrtle Beach Speedway on March 17th.

For more information, visit phoenix-fiber.com, m3-tec.com, justinbonsignore.com, or follow on Facebook or Twitter @jbonsignore.

Choquette Finds Talent In Opener

Choquette Finds Talent In Opener

Dominates At New Smyrna En Route To Red Eye 100 Victory

NEW SMYRNA, Fla. — A night after he joked he ‘ran out of talent,’ Jeff Choquette found it again — and, with it, plenty of speed — at New Smyrna Speedway.

The 31-year-old from West Palm Beach, Florida, led 99 of 100 laps en route to winning the 32nd annual Red Eye 100 on Saturday night. On a night when temperatures where 39 degrees at green flag, there was nothing that could cool off Choquette. He set fast time earlier in the evening, and redrew fourth in post-qualifying, and then jumped past defending race winner Bubba Pollard to take the point on Lap 2.

From there, only a caution with 20 laps to go slowed him down. On the restart, though, he blasted back into the lead and pulled away for the win.

“It was a pretty clean race,” Choquette said. “We were able to get away on the restart and get out to a comfortable lead again. I can’t thank the Jet (Tools) guys enough, and hopefully we can keep going.”

It was a far cry from Friday evening, when Choquette smacked the wall in practice and destroyed a good deal of the right side. They changed the rear end on his No. 9 right before qualifying and he was fast from there.

Of course, Choquette knows his way around the high-banked half-mile. The grandson of 1954 NASCAR Modified champion Jack Choquette, Jeff won the 2005 Red Eye 100. He also has wins in the Orange Blossom/Pete Orr Memorial 100 (2005, ’08, ’10, ’17), the Florida Governor’s Cup (2004 and ’07) and is two-time winner of the World Series of Asphalt Racing (2008 Super Late Model, 2017 Pro Late Model).

It looked like Choquette’s only challenger would be Super Late Model veteran Bubba Pollard, winner of two of the last three Red Eye 100s. Pollard qualified third, redrew second and led the first lap before Choquette got by. Pollard seemed content to run second during the extended green-flag run, before suddenly exiting the track on Lap 53. He reported he broke the upper A frame on the left side of the car.

That opened the door for 20-year-old Derrick Griffith from Hudson, New Hampshire, to take second place, followed by Gus Dean. Ryan Moore and former national champion David Rogers rounded out the top five.

Jared Irvin, son of former Cup driver Ernie Irvan, qualified second and finished sixth. Michael Atwell, Anthony Sergi, Jerry Artuso and Stephen Nasse completed the top 10.

Former race winner Travis Cope exited the race just past the halfway point and finished 19th, and Pollard followed a lap later and wound up 18th in the 21-car field.

The Super Late Models will be back on track at New Smyrna on January 20 for the Marion Edwards Memorial 100. The 

The 52nd Annual World Series of Asphalt Stock Car Racing will run at New Smyrna from Feb. 9-17, and will be highlighted by Super Late Models, Pro Late Models and Tour-Type Modifieds. It will also include the NASCAR K&N Pro Series East season opener on Sunday, Feb. 11.

New Smyrna To Kick-Off 2018

New Smyrna To Kick-Off 2018

Red Eye 100 Will Open Whelen All-American Series Season

DAYTONA BEACH, Fla. — For many years, the Super Late Model racing season has started in Florida. 

Saturday, that tradition continues.

The 32nd annual Red Eye 100 for the Super Late Models is set for Saturday night at Florida’s New Smyrna Speedway. The event will help to kick-off the 2018 NASCAR Whelen All-American Series season as the first race that drivers can be awarded points in the 2018 Division I championship chase. It begins a nine-month quest to become the national champion. 

In 2017, Bubba Pollard picked up his second victory in the prestigious event, holding off former track champion Brad May. He also won the race in 2015 and enters as a driver who is looking to get his 2018 racing season started off on the right foot. He is coming off a victory in the Snowflake 100 at Five Flags Speedway to close out last season.

“A little momentum to start the year off gets your guys excited about going racing in 2018,” Pollard said. “We’ve had a couple of weeks off and the cars are prepared. You can do things at this race — test some things, try some things — even that one race, to be ahead of everyone else, it can really help you a lot.”

Even though he can look at the 100-lap feature as a way to knock-out some winter bugs and prepare for the long season of touring the Southeast, the Senoia, Georgia, driver is looking forward to chasing the trophy for a third time. He came close to winning in 2016, but was bested by Cole Anderson in the final laps. 

“I feel like we have struggled there some in the past, but I like the high-banked race tracks, and we have a really good baseline for tracks like that with a lot of grip,” Pollard said of his team. “It has a lot of characteristics that fit my driving style, so we really enjoy going down there. It’s always a lot of fun, but guys like Brad May and David Rogers, they have run excellent down there. Those locals are definitely going to be good.”

New England Super Late Model driver Derek Griffith will also be in contention on Saturday. Griffith is taking the trip south from Hudson, New Hampshire, to compete in the season-opening event. He is hoping to use the race to help prepare his team for Speedweeks and the 52nd World Series of Asphalt Stock Car Racing in February.

“This is kinda a tune-up for us, if everything goes well, we plan to just leave the truck and trailer down there at a friends house and just fly down in February,” Griffith said. “It’s going to be huge for our team. It was kinda a turn-off when we had an engine issue at the end of last year, we ran over 40 races and we had a great year. We are going to go down there with a car that is new to us. We plan to work on it, and hopefully, it is going to be plenty fast enough.”

Griffith has only made one start in the race, back in 2015, where he finished eighth in his first ever visit to the 0.500-mile oval. But the track is unlike many of the tracks he drives up in New England. 

“The speed is incredible and the cars are a little bit different down there. The regulars are people like Pollard — people that have been running there for years,” Griffith said. “You aren’t showing up to just a few weekly guys that are just considered alright. Those guys down there are among the best in the country. You can learn from them. I’ve really had a roller coaster at New Smyrna in the past. It’s either decent or it’s terrible for us. We can run with these guys, we are pretty excited, we’re going for it 110 percent.”

Other recent winners include Travis Cope (2014), Stephen Nasse (2011 & 2013), Rich Clouser (2010) and Tim Russell (2009). The race was not run in 2007 and 2008.

Early entries include track regulars David Rogers, Brad May and Michael Atwell, along with outsiders who will be making the trip, like Gus Dean, Griffith and Pollard. Additional drivers are expected. 

The event schedule for the weekend calls for a rotating practice session on Friday night to get things started. On Saturday, qualifying will commence at 6:15 p.m., followed by the start of feature racing at 7:30 p.m. The Red Eye 100 is the third race in the order of events. The Modifieds, Super Stocks, Mod Minis and Bombers will also be in action on the half-mile oval, filling a full card of racing action that will include qualifying and feature racing.

The 100-lap feature is the first of a pair of events in January on the banked oval. On Jan. 20, the Marion Edwards Memorial Super Late Model 100 takes center stage, before the track turns full attention to the 52nd annual World Series of Asphalt Stock Car Racing, scheduled for Feb. 9-17. The World Series will include the 2018 season opening race for the NASCAR K&N Pro Series East.

Bubba Pollard celebrates the victory in the 2017 Red Eye 100 at New Smyrna Speedway in New Smyrna, Florida. Jim Jones

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